A few more stores decide to keep Thanksgiving

Both Apple and Radio Shack have decided to not open on Thanksgiving.  Good for them.

Like Kelly had mentioned earlier, too many stores are trying to maximize their profits by extending hours as much as possible on Thanksgiving weekend.  And they are doing it at the expense of their lowest-paid employees.  It’s not like the CEOs are going to pull a late shift themselves that day.  But the CEO class really can’t relate to their employees most of the time anyway.

And the supreme irony of this is that being open longer this Thanksgiving weekend is not likely to make the weekend more profitable.  Things sold on Thanksgiving are generally done at the expense of Black Friday sales, rather than generating new sales.  It’s not like people who avoid shopping that weekend or on Black Friday will suddenly decide to go shopping on Thanksgiving Day itself.

Of course, I don’t see a lot of people asking the question “what would happen if ordinary people had more money to spend?” either.  In fact, there’s no shortage of people who complain about the lack of consumer spending without asking “how are regular people supposed to increase their spending when they are broke?” These same people trash talk the idea of raising the minimum wage while talking about how tough a time the very wealthy have with their taxes.  Actually, not so much – especially when you look at the historical patterns.

As one of the broke people, I can definitely say that yeah, if I had a better paying job (or jobs), I would be able to spend more.  And we’re trying to get that better job or jobs.

-Geoff

 

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Tacloban, Samar Island, and two very different storms

After more than a week, many survivors of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines are still struggling to get basics like food, water and shelter.  And places like Samar, Leyte, and Tacloban are now getting mentioned in the news all over the world.  Samar and Leyte seem to have been hit the worst from the typhoon.

I know these place names.  Not because I have ever been there (I haven’t), but because of their famous place in history – specifically, in the fall of 1944, when the Allied invasion of the Japanese-occupied Philippines led to what was the largest naval battle in all of World War Two, and possibly the largest in recorded human history.

Continue reading “Tacloban, Samar Island, and two very different storms”